Ap chemistry chapter 15 applications of aqueous equilibria




Chapter 15 Applications of Aqueous Equilibria

A Summary Step 1 - A stoichiometry problem - reaction is assumed to run to completion - then determine remaining species. Step 2 - An equilibrium problem - determine position of weak acid equilibrium and calculate pH. Therefore, in a titration there are n equivalence points corresponding to each ionizable proton. Careful selection of the indicator will ensure that the end point is close to the equivalence point. Most common acid-base indicators are complex molecules that are themselves weak acids HIn. They exhibit one color when the proton is attached and a different color when the proton is absent.

Page contains a list of acid-base indicators. Henderson-Hasselbach equation is very useful in determining the pH at which an indicator changes color. BaSO 4 is ignored because it is a pure solid so its concentration is constant. Solubility is the amount grams of substance that dissolves to form a saturated solution.

Molar solubility is the number of moles of solute dissolving to form a liter of saturated solution.


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Calculate its K sp value. Calculate its solubility. Therefore, CaF 2 s is formed and precipitation occurs. As NaF is added to the system, the solubility of CaF 2 decreases.

The effect of pH on solubility is dramatic. Chapter 17 Slide 1 of 45 Chapter Chapter 15 Applications of Aqueous Equilibria. The shift in the position of an equilibrium on addition of a substance. Chapter 15 Acid—Base Equilibria. All rights reserved Solutions of Acids or Bases Containing. Acids and Bases Chapter 8. Polyprotic acids However, the most ionization occurs in the first step. Similar presentations. Upload Log in. My presentations Profile Feedback Log out.

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Log in. Composition and Action of Buffered Solutions 1. A buffer is a solution that resists changes in pH when small amounts of acid or base are added. Buffers contain a weak conjugate acid-base pair. So when choosing a buffer, select one in which the acid form has a pKa close to the pH you want. Buffer Capacity A. Buffer Capacity and pH 1. Buffer capacity is the amount of acid or base the buffer can neutralize before the pH begins to change to an appreciable degree. The Henderson-Hasselbalch equation is used to calculate buffer pH: Definitions 1.

1 Applications of Aqueous Equilibria Chapter 15 AP Chemistry Seneca Valley SHS.

Titration is a method of determining the concentration of a solution with the acid-base reaction with a solution of known concentration. Equivalence point is the point in a titration at which stoichiometrically equivalent quantities of acid and base have been brought together.

A titration curve is a graph of the pH as a function of the volume of the added titrant see last 2 pages of notes III. Applications of Aqueous Equilibria V. The reaction between a weak acid and a strong base or between a weak base and a strong acid proceeds to completion--keep in mind when working with these types of titrations Acid-Base Indicators A. Most acid-base indicators are weak acids that are one color in the HIn form and another color in the In— form B.

Indicators are chosen that have a pKa close to the equivalence point of the titration C. The Solubility-Product Constant, Ksp 1. In addition to acid-base equilibria, there is an equilibrium that exists between the precipitated and dissolved state of an ionic substance. The solubility product constant Ksp for this reaction is simply the K expression recall that pure substances are not written in the equilibrium expression and that coefficients become exponents.

Solubility and pH--pH changes will affect the solubility of any substance that has a basic anion. Determination of Q 1. As before, Q called the reaction quotient or ion product can be calculated to determine the direction in which a reaction must proceed to reach equilibrium. The shape of the two curves after equivalence point is the same because pH is determined by the strong base in excess. Two features of titration curves are affected by the strength of the acid: For very weak acids, it is impossible to detect the equivalence point. Weak Acid-Strong Base Titrations: A Summary Step 1 - A stoichiometry problem - reaction is assumed to run to completion - then determine remaining species.

Step 2 - An equilibrium problem - determine position of weak acid equilibrium and calculate pH. Therefore, in a titration there are n equivalence points corresponding to each ionizable proton. Careful selection of the indicator will ensure that the end point is close to the equivalence point. Most common acid-base indicators are complex molecules that are themselves weak acids HIn.

A.P. Chemistry Chapter 15 Applications of Aqueous Equuilibria. - ppt download

They exhibit one color when the proton is attached and a different color when the proton is absent. Page contains a list of acid-base indicators. Henderson-Hasselbach equation is very useful in determining the pH at which an indicator changes color. BaSO 4 is ignored because it is a pure solid so its concentration is constant. Solubility is the amount grams of substance that dissolves to form a saturated solution. Molar solubility is the number of moles of solute dissolving to form a liter of saturated solution.

Calculate its K sp value. Calculate its solubility. Therefore, CaF 2 s is formed and precipitation occurs. As NaF is added to the system, the solubility of CaF 2 decreases. The effect of pH on solubility is dramatic. Chapter 17 Slide 1 of 45 Chapter Chapter 15 Applications of Aqueous Equilibria.

The shift in the position of an equilibrium on addition of a substance. Chapter 15 Acid—Base Equilibria.

Chapter 15 (Applications of Aqueous Equilibria) - Part 3

All rights reserved Solutions of Acids or Bases Containing. Acids and Bases Chapter 8. Polyprotic acids However, the most ionization occurs in the first step.

ap chemistry chapter 15 applications of aqueous equilibria Ap chemistry chapter 15 applications of aqueous equilibria
ap chemistry chapter 15 applications of aqueous equilibria Ap chemistry chapter 15 applications of aqueous equilibria
ap chemistry chapter 15 applications of aqueous equilibria Ap chemistry chapter 15 applications of aqueous equilibria
ap chemistry chapter 15 applications of aqueous equilibria Ap chemistry chapter 15 applications of aqueous equilibria
ap chemistry chapter 15 applications of aqueous equilibria Ap chemistry chapter 15 applications of aqueous equilibria
ap chemistry chapter 15 applications of aqueous equilibria Ap chemistry chapter 15 applications of aqueous equilibria
ap chemistry chapter 15 applications of aqueous equilibria Ap chemistry chapter 15 applications of aqueous equilibria
ap chemistry chapter 15 applications of aqueous equilibria Ap chemistry chapter 15 applications of aqueous equilibria
ap chemistry chapter 15 applications of aqueous equilibria Ap chemistry chapter 15 applications of aqueous equilibria

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